Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Fraser Island - This Is Living!

MARCH 2014: We've been a little bit quiet in posting on this blog and we apologise... but we are always on the search for great content to share.  We recently came across a post on our Fraser Island Barges Facebook page from Hervey Bay local, Scotto, and want to share with you.

Scott (or Scotto as he is known in fishing forums) has been a Hervey Bay local since 2006, but has been fishing (some say obsessed) since he was eight years old. Originally from the Illawarra, just south of Sydney NSW Australia, Scott grew up fishing for anything with fins and spent his teenage years land-based game fishing from just about every ledge along the NSW coast from Coffs Harbour in the North to Green Cape in the South. He picked up my first fly rod in 1989 - a #9wht outfit - which he used to catch Tailor, Salmon, Frigates, Luderick and Bream whilst waiting for a run on the big gear. Here, Scott tells of his family adventure to World Heritage-listed Fraser Island...


Rainforest grows completely in sand on Fraser Island
One of the main decision making factors for our move to Hervey Bay originally was the fabulous fishing variety the region has to offer. This has a lot to do with geographic location and the unique mix of warm and cool water species to be found side-by-side.

Then there is Fraser Island, World Heritage-listed; it ranks up there with Uluru, Kakadu and the Great Barrier Reef. Stretching over 123 kilometres in length and 22 kilometres at its widest point.With an area of 184,000 hectares it is the largest sand island in the world. It truly is a fishing, camping and four wheel driving Mecca that everyone should spend some time on at least once in your life time!

Prior to moving to Hervey Bay we spent a number of our annual family holidays at Kingfisher Bay Resort on the Western side of the Island in January each year. Kingfisher is a fantastic place to stay in, with plenty of activities for the whole family to enjoy and the fishing from the main barge jetty can be great. Kingfisher Bay provides a central base to explore the island from and all the creature comforts of an award winning resort.

Now that we are Hervey Bay “locals” we have had some great holidays camping on the island and will cover how you can to this in this article!

The first decision to address is where to camp or base yourself.  My family has never been keen on sharing their space with dingos, so that ruled out the front beach camping zones. Queensland Parks and Wildlife manages a number of formal campgrounds, where camping permits are required and you need to book and pay camping fees. These formalised camp sites feature water taps or tap stations, and toilets. Most have gas barbecues, deep sinks for washing dishes and information displays. All campgrounds have a 9pm noise curfew and generators are not permitted.

We elected to base ourselves at the Waddy Point - top camp ground, which is fully fenced, has plenty of shady camp sites and a good toilet block with coin operated showers. Waddy Point is also sheltered from the prevailing south east trade winds and conveniently located near to a few of our favourite areas, The Champagne Pools and Indian Head. You can book direct online  or by phone on 13 74 68 (24 hours). It is wise to secure a camp site as far in advance as possible with limited sites booking out a year in advance during peak holiday periods. All vehicles must have a current Fraser Island vehicle access permit, purchased before entering the island and fixed to the lower left side of the windscreen, which can be booked online as well.

The Kingfisher Bay Resort barge takes 50 minutes
Now that you have your camp site booked and vehicle permit sorted you just need to arrange the car ferry. You have a number of ferry/barge options available depending on where you are departing from. You can depart Hervey Bay via River Heads to both Kingfisher Bay and Wanggoolba Creek or Inskip Point if coming up from Rainbow Beach. Barge

We generally get the earliest barge to Kingfisher Bay Resort from River Heads which gives you an excuse to have brekkie at the resort!  The trip across generally takes around fifty minutes which allows you time to slip in a little extra shut eye after an early start if needed.

Once on the island, we like to stop off at the resort cafe for a bite to eat and& coffee before deflating our tyres for the drive ahead. I have found that deflating your tyres straight down to 18-20psi works best for us. It is amazing how many 4X4 vehicles you will see struggling along or bogged with fully inflated tyres. Just ensure you avoid sharp turns and sudden braking, as tyres can roll off their rims at low pressure. We always carry an accurate type pressure gauge and compressor. Tide times play an important role when travelling on the eastern beach with the best time for travel being a few hours either side of low tide - avoid driving two hours either side of high tide. There are also bypass tracks at Poyungan and Yidney Rocks.

Normal road rules apply with all inland roads, vehicle tracks and beaches being designated roads. Speed limits also apply at 35kms on all inland roads and 80kms on the eastern beach with 40km zones around the main resort entrances .Police do patrol all areas of Fraser Island with speed checks and breathe testing being conducted at any time of day.  There are also stretches of the eastern beach which are used as aircraft landing/take-off strips. Take note of the signs in designated areas and watch for aircraft.

When driving on the eastern beach keep an eye out for the numerous gutters that have been created by the numerous freshwater creeks flowing into the sea. Some will have quite deep banks which could lead to you over turning your vehicle if hit one at speed. Eli creek is often one of the deeper ones.

Remember to keep your momentum up in soft sand
On 'good beach days' the sand is hard-packed and makes for excellent driving conditions. On bad days, the tides may not have been high enough to wash way the ruts from the previous day's traffic - resulting in build-up of sand banks.  When driving in deep banks of dry sand, keep the car in a low gear; do not change gears; keep the revs high and do not lose momentum. Where possible, follow someone else's tracks - choose a set of tracks and stay on them. Do not stop the vehicle in soft sand or in creek beds. We always carry a shovel, snatch straps and shackles  just in case!

Cornwells Break Road leads across from Kingfisher Bay to the eastern beach and we generally detour across for a quick swim at Lake McKenzie. Lake McKenzie really is the blue jewel in Fraser’s assets and is a must to visit on every trip. It is a 'perched' lake, which means it contains only rainwater - no groundwater - and is not fed by streams and does not flow to the ocean. The sand and organic matter at the base of the lake forms an impervious layer preventing rainwater from draining away. The sand here is pure white silica and feels great under your feet.

From here, you can head across to Central Station. Central Station was once the centre of the forestry industry when logging was allowed prior to 1991. Many walks leave from Central Station. We had a quick stroll through the rainforest along Wanggoolba Creek down to the boardwalk where Eleasha and Jess had their picture taken alongside a huge Strangler Fig.  We have previously made the big hike up to Basin Lake and admired the impressive Satinay trees in Pile Valley.

75-Miles of great fishing gutters!
Next stop is generally Eurong Beach Resort where you access the eastern beach before heading north. It really is a great experience driving along the eastern beach – which feels like it is never going to end. We always enjoy a quick dip in Eli Creek along the way to Waddy Point, which always revives you.  I am not sure why, but the water always feels like its source is at the South Pole – it's freezing! You can feed the resident Jungle Perch population a few March Flies as well.

By the time I reach the camping ground at Waddy Point, I’m generally itching for a fish - driving past endless fishy looking gutters for two hours will do that too you ! We always look for a shady spot with in strolling distance from the main toilets and shower block. Nothing beats sitting around a BBQ and enjoying a few drinks after a big day.

Once settled you need to set off on a bait collecting mission. Starting with Pipis, we generally head south of Indian Head an hour before low tide. In the past, our best results have come from looking for clusters that had shown themselves in the sand like little domes in the main traffic area. Apparently the vibrations of the tyres cause the Pipis to work up through the hard sand so at low tide, on beaches with car traffic, this is the easiest. Note that sometimes they can appear as little depressions or holes rather than bumps – then it is just a matter of digging them out.

These a definite art to beach worming!
Beach Worms are your next bait target and due to my lack of practice I look for areas with plenty to get the fingers back in tune! I have done well previously north of Orchid Beach around Orange Creek, but any sections of beach with long wet flat areas are worth a try. I like to use an old stocking with some pilchards and used Pipi flesh as the main baits. Now, catching Beach Worms does take practice – not to mention patience – and the key really is getting the worm to bite the bait while you have your fingers depressed around its head. I was always taught to use my finders so you can 'feel' the worm and you will wind up with less heads than when using pliers. The worm will arch its head when it bites the bait and I like to wait until it goes for a second bite, feeling more confident you clamp down with your thumb and index finger as it reaches the top of its arch. Beach worming is good fun and the family will have a ball!

Fraser Island produces some great fishing for a variety of species depending on time of year. Although you can generally expect to find Bream, Tarwine, Whiting and Flathead year round with the best of the Tailor fishing occurring from June to December when massive schools of Tailor migrate to spawn between the island's only rock headlands - Indian Head and Waddy Point.

Scotty with a Pipi-caugt Sweetlip
Although fishing on and between these headlands is closed for all of August and September - to leave spawning fish undisturbed and to protect this unique resource - all other beaches are open to fishing and crowded with schools of fish. The largest Tailor, up to 5kg, can be encountered later in the season. You will also encounter the elusive Mulloway or Jewfish during the winter months when fishing around the tailor schools. Some even chase large Spanish Mackerel, Trevally and Tuna off Indian Head throughout summer.

Generally a basic running sinker rig is ideal when chasing Bream,Whiting and Flathead with approx half metre leader between swivel and hook. I like to use a standard ball sinker when there isn’t too much run or current as you will cover more ground. I prefer a paternoster rig with star sinker at bottom and a set of ganged hooks on a dropper when chasing tailor. Break-away or grapple sinkers will help when fishing in a rip or heavy current.

It's important to be able to read the beach to find the gutters. Weather and tides combine to alter the beach producing low tide and high tide gutters where you will find fish. These surf gutters form between the beach and outer sand banks and you will find gutters open at one or both ends. I find short, narrower gutters that have openings or rips at both the north and south ends generally provide better results. Dawn and dusk are generally the best beach fishing times, but if the conditions and the gutters are right, anytime is a good fishing time. The best gutters are generally found north from The SS Maheno ship wreck to Indian Head and Waddy Point.

If you experience a big south-easterly blow while on the island you can head across to Wathumba Creek on the western side from Orchid Beach. I have had some great fishing in Wathumba Creek from both the bank and kayak. You can also launch small tinnies in the creek and chase pelagics just off shore.

Lake McKenzie is perched high in Fraser's famous dunes
Fraser Island truly is a magical place with so much to see and explore and I have really only covered the top section in this piece. There can be amazing fishing right at the top around The Sandy Cape. Not to mention main passage down at Inskip point where Tuna from the beach are possible. Then there’s the Coffee Rock ledges on the inside at Ungowa – so much to explore – so little time!!!

Blog content and images were reproduced with the author's permission and minor edits may have been made. This story was originally posted on Shimanofish.com.au in December 2013.

Monday, July 1, 2013

Eurong Beach Resort: Cooking Up Some Fraser Fun With That Lovable Larrikin, Al McLeod

JULY 2013: He's a talented Chef; he's a much-loved TV Presenter; he's a columnist for Brisbane News; he's a proud 'new Australian' and he's a real larrikin.  We invited the wonderful Alastair McLeod to blog about his time with us on the world's largest sand island... but to make things interesting, he brought his beautiful mother, radio presenter Candy Devine, brother, partner and our mate, Betto, along for the ride...

Size doesn't matter on Fraser Island
I was imaging what I wanted a stay to look like on Fraser Island it would look like Eurong Beach Resort. On a recent trip - my first - to Fraser, I found myself adjusted to the pace of island life the moment I got to Eurong. Checked in by a wonderful young lady from Dublin who told me her also Irish partner was one of the chefs, I knew we were in good hands. If the truth be known, with so much to see and explore on the island, you may not spend much time at the resort other than a pre-dinner tipple and breakfast and dinner if you choose not to self-cater. However, if you want to laze around the resort there is plenty to distract. There are two pools, great BBQ areas, tennis courts and a restaurant that does magnificently robust meals after a long day on the tracks – it must be that Irish chef!

What I found so very special was Eurong’s location. The clue is in the name as the resort is quite literally on the beach which transforms as the light and tides change throughout day and into evening.

One morning at dawn we went down to the water and drew out a volleyball court in the sand with our toes. We had an imaginary net on the imaginary highway that is the 75 Mile Beach and had the place to ourselves. You could look in either direction to the curvature of the earth and it was just us. After we huffed and puffed for a wee while, we did attract a bit of attention. With the sun still low in the sky a few curious dingos peeked out of the scrub and watched us toss our ball over our imagined net. It was fascinating to see these animals in their natural setting. Seemingly unimpressed with our ball skills, the mum and her pups skulked back into the scrub.

About twenty minutes north of Eurong is the famous Eli Creek that attracts many visitors. Follow the wooden walkway a short way and plunge up to your chest into the creek. After rainfall it becomes a fast-moving, crystal-clear waterway that carries you downstream from whence you came. It is a place of extraordinary pristine beauty the likes of which I have not seen anywhere on earth.  

Reeling them in... Al and the camera-shy Betto do their thing
Back at Eurong for a beer, we get a lesson into unloading the car of the kilos of sand it had taken on board from our travails. There’s quite a trick to it but with the guidance of the Island’s fishing guru, Andrew 'Betto' Betteridge, the car looked brand new. It should have done, the car in fact was only one day old and had spent more of its life on sand than it had on bitumen.

Now let me tell you about this fellow Andrew. He is a one of a kind and worth seeking out on your trip to Fraser. He has spent years working on his beloved island. He took us one morning to a few of his favourite fishing spots. As we headed up the beach, it was with fascination we watched him slow down, jump from his ute, dash to an innocuous spot of sand, dig for a moment and reveal a pipi. Try as I might I couldn’t see what he could see.

"He was like an aquatic Crocodile Dundee."

Andrew shares his sweet spot with the Irish crew
With our bait firmly lodged on our hooks we tossed our lines in gullies around the wreckage of The SS Maheno. Andrew could have cast his bait onto a sixpence which looked much easier to do than it was in reality. Yet, for all our efforts I was the only one to catch a fish. A teeny Fraser Coast Whiting that was promptly returned to the ocean. Later that night Andrew brought a few kilos of Moreton Bay Bugs and prawns while we drank and talked about the ones that got away.

I have never been on a 4WD/fishing style of holiday but I am an irrevocable convert. 75 Mile Beach is my kind of beach and Eurong my kind of resort: great facilities, warm friendly service, knowledgeable and passionate people who have extraordinary pride in the island they are custodians of. With a little luck of the Irish, people like Andrew and such profound natural beauty you will have an amazing island adventure in this gem of a place.

You'll find the lovely Al on Facebook or Twitter... and if you're at Eurong, pop into the XXXX Beach Bar and have a beer with Betto.

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Kingfisher Bay Resort: May Fishing Wrap Up From The Jetty Hut

MAY 2013 : Last month we saw a host of quality fish including Golden Trevally, Whiting, Mackerel, Barramundi, Bream and Flathead landed by eager anglers from our jetty here at Kingfisher Bay Resort.  Many of these fish were caught using rods hired from the Jetty Hut and some were even pulled in by first-time fishers who had just learnt the basics of baiting and casting in our fishing clinics.

The Jetty Hut is a top spot to catch a sunset
As we move towards the winter months, vast schools of Winter Whiting will be moving into the Great Sandy Strait – the body of water that separates Fraser Island from Hervey Bay on the mainland. When fishing for Whiting, I recommend Prawns or Squid from the Jetty Hut (using Squid will let you catch more fish before re-baiting). The deeper water at the end of our jetty is a great spot to target these sporty fish and, if you’re lucky enough to get one on the line, you’ll have loads of fun reeling it in.

If you land a keeper why not take it to The Sand Bar (after you’ve cleaned it), where the chefs will be more than happy to cook it up for you and serve it with some hot chips!

But, we humans aren’t the only ones that find Whiting delicious. A whole host of larger fish prey on Whiting and this makes them great to use as bait. This month there was no shortage of baitfish around the Jetty and towards the end of this month, we saw plenty of large Bream and Mackerel being reeled in on live Whiting, Herring and Pike. If you’re an eager fisherman like me then you’ll know there really is no substitute for live bait and the best option is to grab a bait jig from the Jetty Hut and catch your own.

Hot tip: Please use the specially-designed TAngler bins at the end of the jetty to dispose of your old tangled fishing line, bait bags and hooks. It’s great for the environment. 

As autumn fades we will see an increase in the amount of Whiting and Tailor in and around Fraser Island so, if you’re staying with us, wake up early, grab a bit to eat and head on down to the Jetty Hut where you’ll find all you need to catch yourself a fresh fish meal.

MAY 2013: Kingfisher Bay’s TOP Fish Hunters of the Month
19.5.13 – Campbell Kahl, Hervey Bay

* 50cm Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson)

Caught using live Herring 

* Location – Kingfisher Bay Resort Jetty
* Though this particular fish was undersize and was thrown back, the Spanish Mackerel can grow up to 2 1/2metres long and weigh in excess of 40kg.

* This species is generally found offshore around coastal reefs and are often targeted by recreational anglers as they put up a good fight.


Check out our Instagram page for this shot and more.



5.5.13 – ‘Captain’ Jack Woollard

* 68cm Dusky Flathead (Platycephalus fuscus)
* Caught using live Herring

* Location – Kingfisher Bay Resort Jetty
* The Dusky Flathead varies in colour from a dark greenish/brown to a pale fawn/brown with a blotchy appearance. Look for a dark blotch on the tail for easy identification (see right).

* The legal size for this species is 40cm (min) and 75cm (max).


3.5.13 – Ben Priddle

* 90cm Golden Trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus)
* Caught using live Herring
* Location – Kingfisher Bay Resort Jetty

* GTs are large predatory fish is commonly found in inshore waters around reefs and sandy substrates just like those in the Great Sandy Strait.

* Easily distinguished by its lips and unique colouration, the Golden Trevally can grow up to 120cm.
* Ben did well to land this 90cm, 10kg Golden Trevally and deserves his spot as one of our TOP fish hunters. 


Until next time folks, may the beer be cold and the fish biting,
Ranger Grant.

Monday, May 20, 2013

Kingfisher Bay Resort: Gentle Giants Of The Deep

QUEENSLAND: Yesterday, the first humpback whales of the 2013 Queensland whale watching season were spotted swimming north past Stradbroke Island towards their breeding grounds in the warm waters of the tropical north. The lifecycle of the Southern Humpback Whale brings them into Hervey Bay's Great Sandy Strait every August to October to socialise and to give their newborns time to grow stronger in the calm, protected waters before beginning the long journey south to Antarctica.   

Getting up close to one of the most majestic and powerful creatures on this planet is like touching the fabric of life itself, as writer Jessica Jane Sammut discovered last season on a family holiday to Fraser Island.

*When we say get up close... we mean it...
 When you talk about the ‘great outdoors’ of Australia, there are so many incredible things to list – the red terrain, the incomparable beaches, the aqua marine ocean, the rainforest, the indigenous dreamtime trails; I could go on forever. But one glorious wonder sticks out more than all the rest for me. The humpback whale (Megatera novaengliae).

The most mesmerising of mammals, the humpback whale (measuring as an adult between 12 and 16 metres) is truly an object of majestic fascination for me. Typically migrating up to 25,000 kilometres each year to breed and give birth, the East Coast of Australia is lucky enough to play its role in this path, allowing those who wish to, to get a glimpse of these gentle giants in their own natural habitat. Some people travel around the world to gain such a sight.  We have it right on our doorstep. Lucky? You betcha.

So, it was with absolute glee that last year my family and I booked a holiday to Fraser Island, staying at the Kingfisher Bay Resort, knowing that they offered the only whale watching tour that I had heard of which 100 per cent guaranteed sightings of humpback whales. Excited, much!

Humpback whales are the star attraction on Hervey Bay’s event calendar as they visit like clockwork every season, taking time out of their epic migration to rest near Fraser. The calm waters of the Great Sandy Strait – on the lee of Fraser Island – provide natural protection as these surface-active whales socialise with their young before setting off on the long journey back to Antarctica.

When it comes to whales who is watching whom?
I had heard that in relaxation mode, they could put on a bit of show – tail-slapping, breaching, pectoral slapping, spy-hopping – but I have to admit, all I was really hoping for was to catch a look at even a fin, just so I knew they were close.

So on the third day into our holiday, I boarded the Quick Cat II, camera around my neck, swirling butterflies of nervous anticipation buzzing at my core. Would we see something? How much would we see? Having never gotten up close and personal with a whale before, to say I was looking forward to it would have been an understatement. And boy, I wasn’t disappointed!

Arriving in the deeper water after an hour or so, the captain of the boat confirmed that we were in an area that had been noted that morning as having whales resting, and so we waited. Engine off, eyes abound. The mood on the boat was electric as we all searched the horizon for the object of our affection that morning. And it was not long before our search was over.  For straight ahead, we saw a whale rise her tail and smash it back down into the ocean as if waving hello.

*A truly awe inspiring experience on the water
It was magnificent.

It was spine tingling.

It was breath taking.

We were here and they were just there – like something out of a movie. I knew right then I was logging a memory that I would never forget.  And so it continued – a show that would rival anything I had seen on television. Two whales rising out of the water and disappearing, two babies blasting foam through their blowholes, fins splashing, tails rising and falling, and the ultimate sight – two breaches. I was utterly spell bound. It was the most wonderful example of nature I had ever seen and I truly believe those whales were trying to communicate with us.  They knew we were there and they were happy to let us see what they could do.

On returning to the resort's etty at the end of the morning, I realised my face hurt. Hurt from smiling. I had not stopped since boarding the boat, the smiles graduating to beams of happiness as our whales came to play.

And it is still a memory which makes me smile, even as I write this. I have photos and I have video footage, but most of all, this experience is locked in my heart and head forever. And that is something I will cherish always. Like I say – the Lucky Country? It’s the best place on earth.

The Hervey Bay Humpback Whale Watch season runs annually from 1 August to 31 October and whale watch sightings are guaranteed.  Morning cruises leave daily from Kingfisher Bay Resort aboard the Quick Cat II and can be purchased from the resort or as part of an accommodation package.  If you're in awe of these gentle ocean giants and want to know more, why not follow us on our Facebook page; visit our dedicated website; or tag your photos with #kingfisherbay and #fraserisland on Instagram and share your own experiences?

About the author: Jessica Jane Sammut is an international freelance writer and editor who contributes to the likes of Australian Women’s Weekly, Marie Claire, Practical Parenting, The Sunday Mail, Yahoo!7, Cosmo Pregnancy and The Courier Mail, from her cottage in the palms.

*Photos courtesy of Hervey Bay Whale Watch - our whale watching partners.

Sunday, May 12, 2013

Kingfisher Bay Resort: Fishing News From Fraser Island's Western Side

APRIL 2013: G’day and welcome to our very first monthly fishing wrap up from Fraser Island – we hope it’s the first of many. As regular visitors to Fraser  already know, the Jetty Hut is Kingfisher Bay Resort’s main marine hub for water sports and beach activities, and is a top place to grab some nibbles, a cold beverage and settle in to watch the sun set over the Great Sandy Strait each afternoon.

Great views and even better fishing from the Jetty Hut
Fraser Island itself is also a thriving hotspot for fishing activity along Australia’s east coast and fishing off the resort’s jetty and in the gutters on the eastern beach is a great experience for young and old alike. At Kingfisher Bay, we even run clinics for those that want to learn to fish and our regulars are always ready with a smile and a tip.

From my station at the Jetty Hut, I have a spectacular view across the Great Sandy Strait, past Big Woody and Little Woody Islands towards Hervey Bay.  Little Woody and its surrounding reefs were once popular fishing destinations but are now inside a designated green zone – or ‘no take’ fishing area unless you have a permit – so make sure where you cast your line if you’re out on the water. Inside this zone (between Little Woody and Fraser) lies a large artificial reef which is an excellent FAD (Fish Attracting Device) attracting many species such as Snapper, Parrotfish, Squid and Sweetlip.

Similarly, the mangrove banks and the sandy tidal flats on Sunset Beach at the resort are great locations for Mangrove Jack and Barramundi.  You may even land a nice Bream or Flathead when beach fishing around the mouth of the freshwater creeks.

Baitfish - Hardy Heads, Garfish and Herring - often school under our jetty and attract large pelagic fish such as Mackerel, Trevally, Bluefin Tuna, Queenfish, Coral Trout and Emperors. We’re also currently seeing quite a few Mackerel, Barramundi and Jewfish in the surrounding waters.

Coming into May, we will see the start of the winter Tailor run where fish can reach sizes up to 5kg! Gear up for and target Tailor with gang hooks and pilchards or metal lures (all of which can be purchased from the Jetty Hut) and start reeling those fish in.

APRIL 2013: Kingfisher Bay’s TOP Fish Hunters of the Month

29.4.13 – Jack Woollard

77cm Scaly Jewfish (Nibea squammosa)

Caught using live pike

Location – Kingfisher Bay Resort Jetty

The animal provides anglers with a good sport fish match on light gear and is commonly misidentified as the Silver or Black Jewfish.

Bag limits apply and this species has a minimum size limit of 45 cm.




18.4.13 – David B.

6ft Eastern Shovelnose Ray (Aptychotrema rostrata)

Location – Kingfisher Bay Resort Jetty

Easily recognized by its wedge-shaped disc and long triangular nose, it is commonly called a Shovelnose Shark.

David's 'catch of the day' was caught and released on the beach just beside the jetty.

NB: The picture used in this blog is not the actual fish caught.



13.4.13 – Pete S.

73cm Dusky Flathead (Platycephalus fuscus)

Caught using live bait

Location – Kingfisher Bay Resort Jetty

This large predatory fish is commonly found in estuaries and coastal bays along Australia’s East coast. Live bait works a treat but bait prawns from the Jetty Hut will do just as well.

These Flathead have a maximum legal size of 75 cm and a minimum of 40 cm.





Until next time, may the beer be cold and the fish biting, Ranger Grant.


Grant is an environmental student who loves fishing, kayaking, hiking and free diving when he gets the chance. He is also a passionate musician and is often found entertaining Jetty Hut guests on his acoustic guitar in the afternoons.




Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Eurong Beach Resort: Base Yourself At Eurong

GUEST BLOG: If you love fishing, you'll be hooked by the team at FishMax, who dedicate their lives to ferreting out the top spots and catching the big fish... and best of all sharing them with others.  The boys visited Fraser during a spot of wild weather last year... and this is their story...

The eastern beach has plenty of top spots to fish
QUEENSLAND: Fishermen looking for  for Fraser Island beach fishing  accommodation options need look no further than the Eurong Beach Resort on 75 Mile Beach.  Based on the eastern side of Fraser Island, the resort  has easy access to the surf gutters just out the front, and a short drive to the productive gutters north of the of the Maheno wreck... so staying with the folks at the Eurong means you can get your lines in to the water faster and catch more fish!

Our four-man FishMax team recently based themselves at Eurong as part of a three-day trip to field test the latest Alvey Surf Reels and the new Ford Ranger Twin Cab Ute and all members agreed it was an ideal base for the Fraser Island surf fisherman, particularly given the atrocious weather conditions we encountered.

We chose to take the Barge from River Heads (20 min from Hervey Bay) to Wanggoolba Creek and it took less than an hour to cross the island. Even though we arrived on dark, the helpful resort staff ensured that we were checked in efficiently and that we had a booking for dinner at the resort restaurant. They also made sure we knew the hours for breakfast and offered to provide a packed breakfast to facilitate an early start the next day if required.

Eurong Beach - an oasis for fisher folk!
In fact we decided to fish the gutters in the early dawn, and after what turned out to be a couple of hours of un-productive and very wet fishing, the hot showers and full cooked breakfast back at the resort, meant that we could start the rest of the day warm and well fed.

Accommodation at Eurong is designed to suit all budgets and ranges from hotel units to two-bedroom apartments. The self-contained hotel units have double or twin beds and day beds, which make two single beds for children, but serious fishermen will probably prefer the self-contained, two-bedroom apartments which accommodate up to five people and have large living areas, decks, fully-equipped kitchens, bathrooms and balconies.

EDITOR'S HINT: Ask the team for a room on the lower floors so you don't have to lug your gear up the stairwells!

The rooms have plenty of space for fishermen and their gear, and while certainly not luxurious, they have everything the serious fisherman would want, including, perhaps most importantly, comfortable beds and heaps of hot water in the showers. The food was good solid fair, ideal for filling up the hungry fisho! The Beach Bar is a great place to catch up for a cold beer and a game of pool after a days fishing or when the weather is just too bad for night fishing as was the case for us.

While at the Fraser Island, we spoke to a number of other fishermen who regularly use the resort as their fishing base, and all agreed that it had everything the fishermen needed and given the dreadful weather conditions we encountered, it beat sleeping under canvas hands down! Next time you're fishing the Fraser Island ocean side beaches, you should certainly consider Eurong Beach Resort as your base.

To check out the Eurong Beach Resort specials available right now, email or call them on 1800 111 808 or follow us on our Facebook and Twitter sites.  You can read the original version of this blog and many more stories by the fabulous FishMax team - Australia's top Online Fishing mag!



Monday, March 11, 2013

Cool Dingo Tour: Day Two On Tour With Jill From 'Battered Suitcases'


GUEST BLOG: No-nonsense blogger Jill tells it like it is and it's a great read!  In this post, we return back to her BATTERED SUITCASES blog to follow her adventures on her favourite Fraser Island day - that would be day 2 with the cool peeps from Cool Dingo Tours! Click here if you want to find out what happened on Day 1 with Jill.

My favorite day.  Day Two of our Fraser Island tour started off with a very filling breakfast and a bumpy ride across the island. The bus was nearly silent as everyone concentrated on not getting motion sickness. Despite the rough start, this day was my favorite of the two day tour.

After bouncing across the width of the island we emerged from the forest onto Seventy-Five Mile Beach. My stomach welcomed the long and flat stretch of sand that functions as a highway. Driving so close to the surf was also quite the thrill.

The first stop of the day was at the Maheno shipwreck. The ship was washed ashore in 1935 while on its way to Japan and has been resting on the sand ever since. Due to the condition of the wreck, visitors are not permitted to touch or climb on it. The chunk of metal just screams tetanus.

Champagne anyone?
Our next destination was The Champagne Pools, a definite highlight of the day. Water erosion created several pools in the rocks that fill with water as the waves roll in. The foaminess of the water makes it sparkle...hence the name "Champagne." The day was hot and everyone was eager for a refreshing swim. Due to strong currents and sharks, the pools are one of the only places you can swim in ocean water on the island.

I was a bit reluctant to leave the pools but of course there were more amazing places in store, like Indian Head. Indian Head required a bit of a hike but it was well worth the effort. From the headland you have an amazing view of the island and wildlife. We were able to spot sharks, rays, and turtles swimming in the waters below. Shark attacks are always in the back of your mind while on the beach in Australia... but actually seeing a shark's shadow is a bit unnerving. Thank goodness we were high above the water!

Eli Creek is a popular watering hole
Our last stop of the day was at Eli Creek. Eli Creek is another popular swimming spot but unlike The Champagne Pools, you're swimming in freshwater. Well, more like floating. All you have to do is walk upstream a few hundred meters along a platform, and then float yourself back down. Mike floated while I walked downstream beside him (the water was really cold!). It almost felt like a ride at Atlantis or Wild Wadi.

Unfortunately, our time at Eli Creek was stretched out much longer than expected due to an emergency elsewhere on the island. Another bus broke an axle and when the driver attempted to fix it the jack broke as well. The bus came down on the driver's hands and smashed his fingers. Naturally, as soon as the call came over the radio, our driver rushed off to help. The scary thing about being on Fraser Island is that medical attention is a good distance away. I think someone said a helicopter was coming to pick up the driver and take him to the hospital. We ended up loading as many people from that bus onto ours as possible so that they wouldn't be stranded on the island. Everyone was a really good sport but I'm sure it was a traumatic experience. (Note from Editor, the tour guide/driver is doing well - he was transported to the local hospital in good spirits).

Fraser Island's dingoes are the most purebred in Australia
At this point we also spotted a dingo! Everyone had their eyes wide open looking for one both days. Fraser Island dingoes are the last remaining pure dingoes in Australia (dogs are not permitted on the island to keep it that way).

It was definitely exciting to see one, but I'm glad it was from the safety of the bus. Plenty of precautions are taken on the island to keep people safe, but visitors have been bitten before. Ouch!

Later in the evening we returned to the resort for another swim and some dinner. We hopped back on the ferry and returned to the mainland fully satisfied!  So, would I recommend a tour? Yep! (Another note from the Ed - check out our previous blog post for all of Jill's reasons to join us on tour).

So where to from here?  Jill's off exploring the Whitsundays and beyond - if you want to follow her Australian east coast adventures, check out her blog - Battered Suitcases.  Content has been reproduced with the author's permission.  Cool Dingo fans are always welcome on Twitter... and you can even bag yourself a tour discount if you friend us on Facebook.

Cool Dingo Tour: How To Experience Fraser Island

GUEST POST: Meet Jill. She's a twenty-something primary school teacher and eager blogger who has previously lived in the Middle East and is currently exploring Australia. Jill stumbled across Cool Dingo Tours when she was exploring Australia's east coast - and whilst she didn't indulge her fondness for novelty snacks, she managed to have a fab time on the world's largest sand island.  Here's an excerpt from her BATTERED SUITCASES blog...

There's 75 Miles of gorgeous beach highway to explore
Choosing how to explore Fraser Island was a bit overwhelming for me. Everyone has an opinion on how to visit the famous island, and I didn't want to make the wrong choice.

It was a tough decision, but in the end we decided to just cross our fingers and climb aboard the Cool Dingo bus. I'm glad we did. Here's why:

First, if you've never poured over a guidebook or travel forum trying to figure it all out, you should know that there are essentially three ways to experience Fraser Island.*

1. A guided tour - ride along in a 4WD bus with a tour guide
2. Self drive tag along tour - follow along behind a lead car in a long caravan
3. Independent self drive - make your own itinerary and drive yourself around

Despite being more DIY style travelers, Mike and I did the guided tour and had an amazing time. Of course as everyone knows there are drawbacks to a guided tour: it's expensive, you're on a set schedule, your companions might be annoying, etc. But there are advantages too!

Advantages: 
The wreck of the SS Maheno is a popular spot!
1. You'll learn something! 
As I said in my first post about Fraser Island, I learned a lot. I learned so much (and forgot so much) that I struggled writing about the experience. I couldn't figure out how to fit in all the factual information with a retelling of the events. There are so many cool stories and facts that I left out (Like the guy who came from the American South to log Fraser Island in the 1800s and got really excited to see native people. He was thinking free labor, right? Wrong! The natives didn't enjoy being forced into slavery so they stabbed him to death with spears instead. Makes you chuckle, doesn't it?)

During one of our lunch stops we met up with a self drive tag along tour. Some of the people on the tag along tour complained that they were learning nothing about the fascinating Fraser Island and had no idea what they had or hadn't seen. In fact. most of the guys in the group were already drunk (1pm) and dancing on top of the trucks. That's cool if you're only on the island to party, but why not learn at least a tiny bit about the incredibly unique ecosystem while you're there? And of course if you're leading yourself around the island you'll need a really good book and a lot of patience.

2. You (probably) won't get stuck! 
Driving on Fraser Island is tricky. Depending on the weather the sand can be very, very soft. This means you really need to know what you're doing or you're going to get stuck. Because there is basically one route to each destination on the island, if you get stuck you'll be holding up others, and possibly getting them stuck as well.

Our bus had to stop several times to help people on self drives out of messes. We even had to tow one truck out of a bad situation. Of course, getting stuck for some people is just part of the adventure. However, you'll be really irritating the experienced guides and drivers. Not to mention, you'll be covered head to toe in sand from trying to get your truck to budge. I felt very grateful to have an experienced driver driving us around the island.

Blending in to the natural environmnet
3. You'll sleep in comfort!
If you're on a tag along tour or doing a self drive, chances are you'll be camping overnight (on uncomfortable mats, we were told). Now, I love camping...but we had been doing it a lot. Having camped night after night, the prospect of sleeping in a real bed was just too appealing. Our tour included a night at a resort in dorm accommodation that we fully enjoyed. Plus, we didn't need to worry about dingos or disrupting the ecosystem with our urine (seriously, that's a problem).


You wouldn't want to pee on the Pinnacles of Coloured Sands, would you?

4. You're free to enjoy yourself!
Since Mike and I were basically doing a self drive tour of the east coast, it felt really nice to let someone else do the driving, navigating, and guiding. Two whole days where we didn't have to read from a guidebook, fiddle with the GPS, stop for gas, or wonder if we took the correct turn. It was a welcome break.

So there you go. Four reasons why taking a guided tour was the right choice for me (and Mike).  Have you been to Fraser Island? Which option did you chose and why?
xo, jill

PS This is not a sponsored post for Cool Dingo, in case you were wondering. I just really enjoyed our tour and would recommend this style of exploring Fraser.
*I'm sure there's more but these three options are what you're most likely to encounter while doing research.

Too much fun for just one day... stay tuned as we publish the second installment of Jill's adventures on World Heritage-listed Fraser Island.  Like what you've read? You can catch more of Jill's awesome Aussie adventures on her blog - Battered Suitcases - which is where we discovered her story.  Content has been reproduced with the author's permission.  Or why not visit our Facebook and Twitter pages and say g'day!